Techno-Agorist

Episode 16 - The Right Enemies

We often argue all day long over who is right and who is wrong. How do we know who are the right enemies to be fighting?

My name is Ryan and I am an agorist. Today we are talking about who the right enemies are.

The world is a battlefield of ideas. Everywhere you go, there are competing worldviews, ideas, solution, and perceived problems. Every single person on the planet represents an entirely new and unique set of views and opinions. For those of us active on the internet, we find these views constantly in the forefront and in conflict with the views of others.

While in so-called "real life" we tend to stuff controversial views or diplomatically avoid certain topics in certain company, the internet has a fascinating tendency to bring people's most controversial views to the forefront.

What you end up with are constant battles being fought on every platform and in every subgroup. One group says this, another says that. One group are the progressives and another are the conservatives. One group are the statists and another are the libertarians. One group are the minarchists and another are the anarchists.

Who is right and who is wrong in these battles?

The most common criteria for knowing who is right and wrong is by how much other people agree with you. If someone agrees with you, then they are right. If they disagree with you, then they are wrong. So, the allies become those who agree and the enemies become those who disagree.

The question I am left with is simply, "Are these battles worth fighting?"

Every moment that I spend fighting with somebody online is a moment that I am not using to make my life better. I shudder to imagine how much time I have wasted in stupid arguments over the years. Sometimes I do make progress and change someone's mind, but most often we just go back and forth arguing over the same things that we have argued over hundreds of times before.

So, who is the real enemy? Who is the right enemy? Who are those that we should be fighting against?

I would say that the correct answer is probably nobody. There is no right enemy when it comes to arguing online. If I spend my time trying to defeat somebody online, I am wasting my time.

Rather than find people to fight against, I think that it is far more important to find people who build me up and make me better. Sometimes this includes people who agree with me more and sometimes it includes people who agree with me less and sometimes it includes people who I know nearly nothing about.

I want to spend my time making life better for myself and my family. Leading a moral crusade to change the minds of people online might be a noble task, but for me, it is a distraction. If I spent every moment of every day trying to change minds, I'll be honest and say that I would end up frustrated and depressed.

If your strategy toward freedom involves changing the minds of everybody around you, then success is outside of your control. Success for you is then reliant on others and you are ultimately at their mercy.

The best strategy toward liberty is one that you can control and that relies on you alone for success. What can you do today to make yourself more free? It could be as simple as buying a stick of memory to make browsing the internet more smooth on your computer, or something more complex like ending relationships with people who are toxic and hold you back.

Only you know what you need to do. Only you know how you can make your life better and more free. If you have to pick a real enemy, it really is anything or anyone that stands between you and the life that you and your family want. Some jerk 3000 miles away who disagrees with you on some political topic isn't your enemy, and if you do spend lots of time trying to fix people online, you might want to stop and check your priorities.

This is Techno-Agorist, episode 16.